Colorado Rockies: The effect of and fixes for the “Coors Field hangover”

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 09: Charlie Blackmon #19 of the Colorado Rockies argues with home plate umpire Ben May #97 after he struck out in the seventh inning against the San Francisco Giants during the Giants home opener at Oracle Park on April 09, 2021 in San Francisco, California. May ejected Blackmon from the game. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 09: Charlie Blackmon #19 of the Colorado Rockies argues with home plate umpire Ben May #97 after he struck out in the seventh inning against the San Francisco Giants during the Giants home opener at Oracle Park on April 09, 2021 in San Francisco, California. May ejected Blackmon from the game. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images) /
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DENVER, CO – JULY 14: The sun sets over the stadium behind the scoreboard as the Milwaukee Brewers face the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field on July 14, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies defeated the Brewers 12-3. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images) /

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For this best-case scenario (and what could actually happen if the league expands) is that the Rockies again join the AL and go into a division with the Texas Rangers, Houston Astros, and Kansas City Royals. Unfortunately, this removes the Rangers/Angels rivalry, but, if expansion happens, that is likely to happen anyway.

This scenario gives two mid-elevation opponents and one sea-level opponent. The Rockies could have the advantage when returning to Coors Field, but not as often. The more important factor is how this change will help them acclimate to sea level easier, giving them those middle elevation series as a stopping point, and hopefully help the team become better when on the road.

In conclusion, the Colorado Rockies have trouble when traveling directly from Coors Field to sea level and are significantly better when starting an away stand at middle elevations. This is inverted though when the team starts homestands. They are better at Coors Field when coming directly from sea level.

There are a few solutions that could help the Rockies have a better shot when they are the away team. However, while the MLB should consciously keep this in mind when scheduling Rockies games, the best solution might just be to wait it out. With expansion on the horizon, it is possible that with new realignments that the Rockies might be placed in a better division to suit their needs as a ball club and make them more competitive.

Momentum is everything, and being good at Coors Field is one thing, but losing all that momentum and losing an entire season because of a 5,280-foot drop in elevation is just simply not fair.

Next. The top five reasons you can’t blame the Colorado Rockies for signing so many reclamation projects. dark

Note: Data, statistics, and records were found using Retrosheet and Baseball-Reference.

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