Dads and baseball: Some Colorado Rockies memories and special bonds

By Editorial Staff
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1990: Ken Griffey Jr. of the Seattle Mariners stands with his father Ken Griffey Sr. during a game. Mandatory Credit: Ken Levine /Allsport
1990: Ken Griffey Jr. of the Seattle Mariners stands with his father Ken Griffey Sr. during a game. Mandatory Credit: Ken Levine /Allsport /

Baseball has always been a game that has been passed down through generations. Part of that is the experience of being in the ballpark (which may not happen in 2020) or watching the games on television or now through a streaming service (which may not happen if you live in one of MLB’s infamous blackout zones).

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How baseball-centered memories are created may be different this year, but they can certainly still happen. There’s still plenty of debate that can happen about the PEDs and inclusion in the Hall of Fame, who had the prettiest swing in baseball history (we’re still taking Ken Griffey Jr. on that one, sorry CarGo fans), and what might have happened if Wally Pipp hadn’t had a headache, giving Lou Gehrig a chance to get into the starting lineup for the Yankees.

As a dad, one thing I have tried to do is keep baseball as a part of the conversation between my daughter and me. As an infant, she slept through most of her first-ever baseball game at Wrigley Field. As a college student, she watched a sunset at Coors Field while devouring some apple pie nachos.

Baseball frames the conversation between dads and kids (or grandpas and kids, moms and kids, or any combination of adult and child imaginable). Yes, baseball is an important part of the fabric of our society. But even more important are the thousands of conversations that go on in the stands as the game is being played.

Next. The Rockies and their role in the great home run chase of 1998. dark

Those conversations won’t happen in the stands this Father’s Day, but they can still happen on FaceTime, Skype, or over the phone. Here’s hoping this Sunday you have a meaningful talk with your dad (or child … or friend … or someone) that does more than just skim the surface. It’s always good to really reconnect … and it’s always good to talk about the game we all love.

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