Colorado Rockies: The top 10 best hitting pitchers in franchise history

Colorado Rockies starter Mike Hampton pitches against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fourth inning 01 July 2001 in Phoenix. AFP Photo/Mike FIALA (Photo by Mike FIALA / AFP) (Photo by MIKE FIALA/AFP via Getty Images)
Colorado Rockies starter Mike Hampton pitches against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fourth inning 01 July 2001 in Phoenix. AFP Photo/Mike FIALA (Photo by Mike FIALA / AFP) (Photo by MIKE FIALA/AFP via Getty Images) /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
6 of 6
Next
2 Apr 2001: Mike Hampton #10 of the Colorado Rockies winds back to pitch the ball during the game against the St. Louis Cardinals at Coors Field in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies defeated the Cardinals 8-0.Mandatory Credit: Tom Hauck /Allsport
2 Apr 2001: Mike Hampton #10 of the Colorado Rockies winds back to pitch the ball during the game against the St. Louis Cardinals at Coors Field in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies defeated the Cardinals 8-0.Mandatory Credit: Tom Hauck /Allsport /

More from Rox Pile

Number 2: Bill Swift (42 OPS+, 77 plate appearances)

Bill Swift was a Colorado Rockie for parts of three seasons but in the middle season (1996), he was injured for much of the season.

However, when he did play, he hit well, at least compared to most pitchers. As a Rockie, he hit .213/.294/.295 with an OPS+ of 42 in 77 plate appearances. He also had a home run and six RBI.

In three seasons with the Giants, he also had an OPS+ of 42 so it looks like his hitting skills were more genuine and not the “Coors” effect.

Number 1: Mike Hampton (109 OPS+, 152 plate appearances)

As you can tell by the OPS+, the race for number one is not even close. There’s a reason why Mike Hampton won five Silver Slugger Awards in his career, which is the most by a pitcher ever.

He struggled mightily as a pitcher with the Rockies but obviously, his offense didn’t suffer.

He played two seasons with the Rockies and in both seasons, he won the Silver Slugger Award. Combined between the two seasons, he had 10 home runs, 21 RBI, and he hit a mind-boggling .315/.329/.552. That’s pretty good for a position player, let alone a pitcher.

His best season was his second and final (2002) as he hit .344/.354/.516 with an OPS+ of 113.

Next. Top 5 Shortstops in Rockies History. dark

His offense was never as good before or after he left the Rockies but his OPS+ was in the fifties with the other teams. Hence, why he still won three Silver Slugger Awards outside of a Rockies uniform.

facebooktwitterreddit