Colorado Rockies Quick Hits: Spring training, Gray, Arenado, more

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JUNE 12: Starting pitcher Jon Gray #55 of the Colorado Rockies throws a pitch in the first inning during a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citizens Bank Park on June 12, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Hunter Martin/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JUNE 12: Starting pitcher Jon Gray #55 of the Colorado Rockies throws a pitch in the first inning during a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citizens Bank Park on June 12, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Hunter Martin/Getty Images) /
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In this article, Mark Kiszla of The Denver Post has a simple solution to deal with the current heightened awareness about the potential departure of Nolan Arenado after this season: Pay the man.

On the surface, it sounds good … but there is catch with Kiszla’s plan. He suggests a four-year contract worth $140 million. While that averages out to $35 million per season, it’s also a smaller sum and shorter deal than is believed Arenado will be seeking from the Rockies (and other teams) when the time comes.

Much of the discussion surrounding Arenado and what he could bring to the market is still in a state of flux with Manny Machado and Bryce Harper still unsigned and contract numbers ranging from $175 million to $300 million floating around. Until the two biggest free agents of 2019 sign, it is truly tough to see what Arenado could be looking at for next season and beyond.

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Colorado general manager Jeff Bridich has made it clear the Rockies have already begun talking with Arenado and his representatives about the future and how Colorado plays into it. Of course, there is still the subject of unsettled arbitration lingering between Arenado and the Rockies. Could how that plays out impact Arenado’s desire to stay in Colorado?

There is still plenty to be determined when it comes to Arenado. However, we know that he will be looking for a payday that extends well into his 30s. A four-year deal means that, in his early 30s, Arenado would once again be testing the market and, with his prime years behind him, his value could likely do down.

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With that in mind, don’t expect a four-year deal to get it done and keep Arenado on the Colorado hot corner in 2020.

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