Colorado Rockies: when will Riley Pint be ready for the MLB?

jjensen
DENVER, CO - JULY 27: A young fan holds a baseball hoping to get an autograph as the Milwaukee Brewers face the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field on July 27, 2013 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
DENVER, CO - JULY 27: A young fan holds a baseball hoping to get an autograph as the Milwaukee Brewers face the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field on July 27, 2013 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images) /
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At a young age of just 18 years  old, Riley Pint was drafted with the fourth pick in the 2016 MLB Amateur Draft by the Colorado Rockies. Pint is one of the brightest young prospects in the entire MLB. Coming out of high school, die-hard Rockies fans, like me, tend to constantly check in and await his arrival in the major leagues. Unfortunately for us, he still has a long way to go. But why not check in on his stats and make a prediction when we could see him in the purple pin stripes?

Single A Statistics:

Looking at stats alone, I regret to say we still have a long way to go. At 6’4″, Pint can throw the ball well over 100 miles per hour. Everyone knew the only thing that could keep him back is his strike count. Which, unfortunately, doesn’t looks so good. Pint has 59 walks in just 93 pitched innings. A little more than a walk every other inning. Looking in the bright side, he does also have 115 strikeouts, which is quite dominant.

Do not even get me started on his ERA. Clearly, his “K count” is not translating to quality starts. Right now, his ERA is a depressing 5.40, which we all know will not cut it at the MLB level. Let’s be honest, if your ERA is 5.40 in single A, who knows what you would be at in the big leagues. We also haven’t even brought up the fact Pint is 3-16. Your wins and losses count as a pitcher is an overrated stat. But if your team’s record is that bad, we know we have a problem.

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Do not let these statistics worry you, however.

Let’s not forget Riley Pint is just a bit longer than a year removed from high school level hitters. That means he is still learning a lot more than just surviving professional baseball. He has to learn how to live on his own, for one. Just last year he was supported by his parents. It is crazy to think about, but definitely something that cannot be forgotten.

For baseball in high school, you can afford to make mistakes and not get hurt, especially when you throw over 100 miles an hour. That statement cannot be made about the pros, even in Single-A. Any and all mistakes get taken advantage of. He just needs to figure out how to paint the corners better without walking as many batters.

Next: Recalling the Rocktober Streak (part one)

If he can accomplish that, we can expect a lot out of him. But it will still be a little while.

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