On Boxing Day, a hope for the Colorado Rockies spending in 2022

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - DECEMBER 26: People browse apparel at Cotton On at Bourke Street store during the Boxing Day sales on December 26, 2021 in Melbourne, Australia. Australians celebrate Boxing Day with many taking advantage of the post-Christmas sale prices in what is usually the busiest day of the year for retailers in Australia. In Sydney, thousands of people usually gather around and on the harbour to watch the start of the Sydney to Hobart yacht race. (Photo by Diego Fedele/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - DECEMBER 26: People browse apparel at Cotton On at Bourke Street store during the Boxing Day sales on December 26, 2021 in Melbourne, Australia. Australians celebrate Boxing Day with many taking advantage of the post-Christmas sale prices in what is usually the busiest day of the year for retailers in Australia. In Sydney, thousands of people usually gather around and on the harbour to watch the start of the Sydney to Hobart yacht race. (Photo by Diego Fedele/Getty Images) /
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On December 26, Boxing Day is celebrated in Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, the Bahamas, South Africa, and Nigeria. If you’re reading this article from one of those countries, here’s not only hoping that your Boxing Day is amazing, but also that you’ll send some of the sentiments for the day toward the Colorado Rockies.

So what is Boxing Day if you’re not familiar with the term? There is plenty of historical data on why Boxing Day exists, including that it was once a time for tradesmen to receive boxes of gifts for the work they had done all year. Now, much of the tradition around the day revolves around spending money in a different way —‚shopping and finding deals on the day after Christmas.

And this is where my thoughts turn to the Colorado Rockies.

A Boxing Day lesson that can hopefully be put into place by the Colorado Rockies

You see, the key to Boxing Day shopping is to be smart about where you’re spending your money. If you’re shopping on Boxing Day, you likely have money that was given to you over the holidays. If you’re going to spend it, don’t you want to spend it in the best way possible?

The Rockies have spent money in the past, ranking in the top half of MLB spending from 2018-2020 before placing 18th last season with a $114.1 million payroll. They just haven’t spent it as wisely as they should (we’re looking at you, Ian Desmond and Daniel Murphy). Spend the money on players in the prime of their careers who will play the positions that they know well, not the ones where you need someone to play. In Boxing Day terms, don’t buy a blender if you need a toaster.

It’s also not about spending because things are cheaper or on sale. It’s about finding the right things at the right price. Just because you can buy something doesn’t mean you always should (we’re looking at you, Mike Hampton and Bryan Shaw), especially when all sales are final.

This Boxing Day, the Rockies can’t spend any money since the Major League Baseball lockout is in effect. They can, however, make a plan for when the shopping begins again and see exactly how they can bring more offense to a lineup that won’t include Trevor Story in 2022 and build up a back end of the bullpen that is in desperate need of a veteran closer. They can be ready to pounce when MLB’s doors swing open and the opportunities to spend to improve the team lie ahead.

Next. Breaking down a Rockies-Mariners trade proposal. dark

If you’re going shopping, have a plan and spend a fair amount to get a quality return. Seems like a Boxing Day thought that would benefit the Rockies greatly in Bill Schmidt’s first offseason as the team’s general manager, doesn’t it?

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