The Colorado Rockies best, worst positions by fWAR in the last month

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 24: Nolan Arenado #28 of the Colorado Rockies reacts to a strike out during the game against the San Francisco Giants at Oracle Park on September 24, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Daniel Shirey/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 24: Nolan Arenado #28 of the Colorado Rockies reacts to a strike out during the game against the San Francisco Giants at Oracle Park on September 24, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Daniel Shirey/Getty Images) /
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Tony Wolters of the Colorado Rockies
DENVER, CO – AUGUST 28: Tony Wolters #42 of the Colorado Rockies looks on during a game against the San Diego Padres at Coors Field on August 28, 2020 in Denver, Colorado. All players are wearing #42 in honor of Jackie Robinson Day. The day honoring Jackie Robinson, traditionally held on April 15, was rescheduled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Dustin Bradford/Getty Images) /

The number one weakness has been a weakness for the Rockies for decades.

#1 weakness: Catcher

Every Rockies fan or observer knows that the Rockies catchers have not been … the strongest catching trio in baseball history, to put it nicely. Since August 9, Rockies catchers have accumulated an fWAR of -0.8, which is second-worst in baseball. They have a wRC+ of 28 and they are hitting .161/.211/.280.

They aren’t particularly good defensively, either, as they were 25th in Defensive Runs Above Average (DEF) entering Wednesday and Statcast suggests that they are not great pitch framers either. Drew Butera and Tony Wolters are the only two catchers that qualify for the league in pitch framing and they are 29th and 50th in baseball, entering Wednesday.

The stats say that Elias Diaz is the best pitch framer and offensive catcher… yet, of the three catchers, he sees, by far, the least amount of playing time.

#3 strength: Left Field

Raimel Tapia started off the season very slowly, which is part of the reason why he was not getting much playing time. Through August 10, Tapia was hitting .125/.167/.125 (2-for-16) with two singles, one RBI, and one walk.

Since August 11, though, Tapia has been the Rockies’ primary left fielder. In 25 games (all starts and 19 in left field), Tapia is hitting .340/.442/.447 with one home run, 11 RBI, three doubles, two triples, and 12 walks.

Overall, Rockies left fielders have an fWAR of 0.9, which is 11th in baseball since August 9.

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