Colorado Rockies: The 10 biggest draft busts in franchise history

DENVER, CO - JULY 2: Greg Reynolds #37 of the Colorado Rockies pitches during the game against the Kansas City Royals at Coors Field on July 2, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Garrett W. Ellwood/Getty Images)
DENVER, CO - JULY 2: Greg Reynolds #37 of the Colorado Rockies pitches during the game against the Kansas City Royals at Coors Field on July 2, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Garrett W. Ellwood/Getty Images) /
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DENVER, CO – SEPTEMBER 24: Kyle Parker #16 of the Colorado Rockies runs during the game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Coors Field on September 24, 2015 in Denver, Colorado. The Pirates defeated the Rockies 5-4. (Photo by Rob Leiter/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
DENVER, CO – SEPTEMBER 24: Kyle Parker #16 of the Colorado Rockies runs during the game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Coors Field on September 24, 2015 in Denver, Colorado. The Pirates defeated the Rockies 5-4. (Photo by Rob Leiter/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /

Number 9:  Kyle Parker

The Rockies drafted Kyle Parker in the first round of the 2010 MLB draft with the 26th overall pick out of Clemson.

The Rockies sent him to Single-A Asheville and for the next three seasons, between Asheville, Advanced-A Modesto, and Double-A Tulsa, Parker played well. In each of the three seasons, he played a minimum of 103 games with a minimum of 21 home runs and 73 RBI and his lowest slash line numbers were .285/.345/.483.

After starting the season at the Triple-A level for the first time in 2014 and playing well, the Rockies called him up to the majors. In just 26 plate appearances, though, Parker only had an OPS+ of 11.

The following season, he started the season at Triple-A again and he saw his minor league numbers decrease as he hit .280/.326/.431 in 93 games. He was still called up to the majors later in the season and in 112 plate appearances, he hit .179/.223/.311 with an OPS+ of 35. The Rockies gave up on him at the end of Spring Training in 2016 and the Reds signed him later that season but he only played in Double-A. That was his final season in professional baseball.

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