Colorado Rockies: A look at the Hall of Fame case for Todd Helton

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PHILADELPHIA – OCTOBER 07: Todd Helton #17 of the Colorado Rockies bats against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game One of the NLDS during the 2009 MLB Playoffs at Citizens Bank Park on October 7, 2009 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images)

In the past week or so, the 2019 Hall of Fame ballot was released and, as expected, among the first timers, Todd Helton is on the ballot. However, considering the Coors Field bias that most of the BBWAA members have, he may be a long shot, at least this season.

Whether it’s because a disdain for Denver and/or Coors Field, ignorance of numbers, or just sheer stupidity, the Baseball Writer’s Association of America writers that have votes for the Hall of Fame do not like Rockies players but if you look at the numbers, there a couple of Rockies that should be Hall of Famers.

One of them is Todd Helton. If you are a Rockies fan who saw Helton on a day in and day out basis, you probably already know this. However, the numbers back it up.

For me personally, when I look at a player, to determine them to be a “Hall of Famer”, I want to see eight “Hall of Fame” seasons and it helps in particular if the seasons are bunched together. For Helton, I see eight Hall of Fame seasons in a row plus two more seasons after.

The seasons that are together are 1998 through 2005. In those seven seasons, these are the numbers that he posted.

Standard Batting
YearAgeGRH2BHRRBIBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSOPS+TBAwards
199824152781673725975354.315.380.530.911119281RoY-2
19992515911418539351136877.320.395.587.981122339
200026160138216594214710361.372.463.6981.162163405AS,MVP-5,SS
200127159132197544914698104.336.432.6851.116160402AS,MVP-9,GG,SS
20022815610718239301099991.329.429.5771.006148319AS,MVP-19,GG,SS
200329160135209493311711172.358.458.6301.088165367AS,MVP-7,SS
20043015411519049329612772.347.469.6201.088165339AS,MVP-16,GG
GRH2BHRRBIBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSOPS+TBAwards
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/28/2018.

 

His average season during this span was 157 games with 192 hits, 47 doubles, 35 home runs, 118 RBI, 94 walks, only 76 strikeouts, and a .340/.464/.620, and a 149 OPS+ (or 49 percent better than league average). The OPS+ is the big number here considering that it is park adjusted, so the “well, he played half of his games at Coors Field” don’t really have an excuse.

The other three seasons that are borderline Hall of Fame worthy for me are these three.

Standard Batting
YearGRH2BHRRBIBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSOPS+TBAwards
20051449216345207910680.320.445.534.979144272
20071548617842179111674.320.434.494.928133275
2009151791773815868973.325.416.489.904127266MVP-13
GRH2BHRRBIBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSOPS+TBAwards
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/28/2018.

 

To me, those seasons and the other seven put him over the top, but there are a fewer other things to look at.

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