Colorado Rockies: Is their 2018 season like their 2008 season?

DENVER, CO - MAY 30: Carlos Gonzalez #5 of the Colorado Rockies and starting pitcher Derek Holland #45 of the San Francisco Giants react after Gonzalez lined out to center field with two runners on to end the fifth inning at Coors Field on May 30, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Justin Edmonds/Getty Images)
DENVER, CO - MAY 30: Carlos Gonzalez #5 of the Colorado Rockies and starting pitcher Derek Holland #45 of the San Francisco Giants react after Gonzalez lined out to center field with two runners on to end the fifth inning at Coors Field on May 30, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Justin Edmonds/Getty Images) /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
1 of 4
Next
Nolan Arenado of the Colorado Rockies at bat
DENVER, CO – JUNE 3: Nolan Arenado #28 of the Colorado Rockies hits a RBI double off of Alex Wood #57 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning at Coors Field on June 3, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Justin Edmonds/Getty Images) /

In 2007, the Colorado Rockies had their best season in the young history of their franchise as they were the champions of the National League. In 2018, the Colorado Rockies won the second National League Wild Card spot but they were eliminated in the NL Wild Card game. After both of each of those playoff seasons, they have fallen flat in the first half of the season but, when taking a closer look, are the teams really that similar?

It is a phenomena that has been bandied about on social media and elsewhere (for good reason): Are the 2018 and 2008 Rockies, essentially the same?

On the surface, you may say yes. After all, they are/were two teams that made the playoffs the previous season, they had a lot of expectations entering the following season, and both (at least thus far for the 2018 Rockies) have not played as they are capable of.

There’s a term that is used a lot when talking about playoff teams. It is known as the “hangover.” Playing a longer season than the regular season can take a toll on players because a) they are playing up to 20 games more; b) up to 20 games that are under extreme scrutiny from local media and fans as well as nationally; and c) it cuts into their offseason routine.

facebooktwitterreddit