Former Colorado Rockies that are on the 2018 Hall of Fame Ballot

DENVER - APRIL 5: Right fielder Larry Walker #33 of the Colorado Rockies runs to first base during the game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Coors Field on April 5, 2003 in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies defeated the Diamondbacks 4-3. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)
DENVER - APRIL 5: Right fielder Larry Walker #33 of the Colorado Rockies runs to first base during the game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Coors Field on April 5, 2003 in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies defeated the Diamondbacks 4-3. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images) /
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DENVER – JULY 7: Larry Walker #33 of the National League bats during the MLB All-Star Game at Coors Field on July 7, 1998 in Denver, Colorado. The American League defeated the National League 13-8. (Photo by: Brian Bahr/Getty Images)
DENVER – JULY 7: Larry Walker #33 of the National League bats during the MLB All-Star Game at Coors Field on July 7, 1998 in Denver, Colorado. The American League defeated the National League 13-8. (Photo by: Brian Bahr/Getty Images) /

Larry Walker is the longest tenured Rockie in this list and he has the best shot at making the Hall of Fame. He definitely is a good candidate for it but considering the log-jam of players and people saying that his numbers are due to playing in Coors Field, Walker has fallen through the cracks in the national scope of things.

However, he is one of the best, and most important Rockies, in franchise history, as we pointed out in this article from this Tuesday.

In his career, Walker spent 10 of his 17 MLB seasons with the Rockies. Overall, he played in 1,988 games with 2,160 hits, 471 doubles, 383 home runs, 1,311 RBI, 230 stolen bases, 913 walks compared to just 1,231 strikeouts with a .313 career batting average, a .400 on-base percentage, a .565 slugging percentage, and an OPS+ of 141 (which, mind you, is adjusted to the average of the park’s players play in and, still, Walker is 41 percent better than league average).

He is a five-time All-Star (including four of them in a Rockies uniform), a seven-time Gold Glove Award winner (with five in a Rockies uniform), a three-time Silver Slugger Award winner (2 while with the Rockies), a three-time batting champion (all with the Rockies), a one-time home run leader (with the Rockies), and he even won the 1997 National League Most Valuable Player of the Year Award.

However, in the seven previous times that Walker was on the Hall of Fame ballot, the 22.9 percent of the vote that he garnered in 2012 is the highest he has ever achieved, which is far short of the 75 percent required for induction. Last season, he got 21.9 percent, which has increased a few points every year since 2013, when he got just 10.2 percent of the vote.

On Baseball Reference, they have a section that has the top ten players that are similar to the one you are looking at. For Walker, four of the 10 most similar are Hall of Famers and, the number one most comparable player is former Dodgers outfielder Duke Snider. Snider, made it into the Hall of Fame on his 11th ballot in 1980 (at the time, you could be on the ballot up to 15 times. A few years ago, they dropped that to just 10 years).

Walker will probably gain some votes but I would not be shocked if he doesn’t get more than even thirty percent this season.

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